Campus Crime

Clery Act & Campus Crime Reports

In 1990, the Clery Act was passed requiring colleges and universities that receive federal funding to disclose campus safety information. It also sets requirements for handling sexual violence. In addition to information about policies, procedures and victim’s rights, the reports contain statistics of reported crimes that have occurred during the last three years on campus, off campus within properties owned by the school and on public property accessible from or adjacent to campus. In California, new requirements were imposed by California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White’s office reflecting guideline changes on sexual assault to accommodate the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act and the Violence Against Women Authorization Act of 2013.
Cal Poly Pomona 2015 report: While alcohol and drug offenses lead the list of violations, the report shows a relative decline in the offenses. On-campus alcohol offenses totaled 280 violations in 2013, 140 in 2014 and 64 in 2015. On-campus drug offenses tallied 96 violations in 2013, 125 in 2014 and 52 in 2015. There were two reported cases of rape in 2013, four in 2014 and four in 2015. There were no reported cases of dating violence in 2013 and 2014, and five in 2015; and no reported cases of domestic violence in 2013, two in 2014 and five in 2015.
Colorado State University 2015 report:. On a campus with about 32,000 students, there were 46 reported cases of sexual assault and 23 reported rapes. Dating and Domestic Violence: 20 Stalking: 12 Arrests for Liquor Law Violations: 91 Alcohol Disciplinary Referrals: 1,072 Arrests for Drug Abuse Violations: 63 Drug Disciplinary Referrals: 392


Reports of one negligent manslaughter, five rapes, one fondling, two aggravated assaults and one religious hate crime were among more than 100 incidents from 2015 revealed in the 2016 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, released by Hofstra per federal requirement. Of the five rapes reported, four occurred in residence halls, meaning the fifth occurred elsewhere on campus. In the context of the report, rape is defined as “penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person without the consent of the victim.” The number of rapes reported however, seems surprising considering the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network’s (RAINN) statistic that 11.2 percent of all students experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence or incapacitation. Furthermore, RAINN states that “Among undergraduate students, 23% of females and 5.4% of males experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation.”

Crime at Hofstra Reported In 2015 Includes Five Rapes, Negligent Manslaughter

By Laurel O’Keefe

Oct 11, 2016

Reports of one negligent manslaughter, five rapes, one fondling, two aggravated assaults and one religious hate crime were among more than 100 incidents from 2015 revealed in the 2016 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, released by Hofstra per federal requirement.

“These are crimes that are reported to us, that doesn’t mean that through the course of the investigation it was proven to be true,” said Lynda O’Malley, assistant director of public safety and one of the compilers of the report.

All colleges and universities who receive federal funding are mandated to release campus crime statistics, as well as their security and safety policies and procedures under the Jeanne Clery disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, or the Clery Act, enacted in 1990.

At Hofstra, the report is linked in an email sent out to all students and faculty, as well being posted as a PDF on Hofstra’s website. Yet, while the information is there for reference, students seem overwhelmingly unaware of the report and its contents.

“I didn’t even know [the report] was a thing, never mind that it is available to us,” said Amanda Deamer, a freshman computer science major. “It’s almost not looked at as important if it’s in an email, I just look through and figure it’s just another thing from Hofstra.”

The 2016 report is composed of 41 pages, which includes a statistic chart of all offenses. Some rows of the chart are blacked out due to changes in laws. For example, the rows titled “sexual offences,” both forcible and non-forcible, have been blacked out for 2014 and 2015 due to a change in law that reclassified them, mandating that these incidents be included under the data for rape.

The report does not reveal information on the students involved in any report or crime.

However, when a case goes to trial and someone faces prosecution because of their actions, their identities are then public knowledge.

For example, the negligent manslaughtuntitleder report can likely be attributed to the death of Olivia McClellan, who passed away after receiving a fatal overdose of heroin from former Hofstra student Joseph Joudah.

In April 2015, Joudah, McClellan’s boyfriend at the time, left McClellan alone in her Enterprise Hall dorm after they both took heroin. Joudah then waited 17 hours before anonymously calling Public Safety.

Joudah pleaded guilty to the charge of negligent manslaughter. He was sentenced with five years’ probation on Sept. 23 of this year; and was granted youthful offender status, leaving his criminal record sealed.

Of the five rapes reported, four occurred in residence halls, meaning the fifth occurred elsewhere on campus. In the context of the report, rape is defined as “penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person without the consent of the victim.”

The number of rapes reported however, seems surprising considering the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network’s (RAINN) statistic that 11.2 percent of all students experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence or incapacitation.

Furthermore, RAINN states that “Among undergraduate students, 23% of females and 5.4% of males experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence, or incapacitation.”


MSUPD Releases Stats on Crime and Safety for the Past Three Years

By Colton Wood

October 13, 2016

MSU police released its Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. The report includes crime and fire data for 2013-15 while including an extensive amount of information related to safety and security, including policies on security, alcohol and drug use, sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking, crime prevention and reporting crimes.

The crime section of the report listed 12 categories of crimes reported on MSU’s campus and six categories of liquor, drug and weapons law violations. The fires section of the report lists fires that have occurred in residence halls on campus.

The report showed a decrease in the majority of specific criminal offenses committed at MSU.capture

The report showed a decrease in the majority of specific criminal offenses committed at MSU.

However, the report did show aggravated assault crimes have increased through the previous three years

The report also revealed that in 2013-15, there were no manslaughter cases or instances of non-forcible sexual offenses — incest or statutory rape — on campus.

The fire section of the report showed a decrease in fires reported in campus residence halls, but the value of property damage was significantly higher.

In 2013, there were four fires reported with two of them being listed as intentional. The total cost of property damage of those fires was $1,400.

The year 2014 had six fires reported. Bailey Hall and McDonel Hall each had two fires occur during 2014. McDonel Hall’s property damage of $5,100 was the most costly of all the residence halls that year. Bailey Hall and Armstrong Hall both accumulated a property damage value of $100 while Holden Hall had one reported arson, but the report said there was no property damage.

The most catastrophic year in terms of property damage was 2015. On Feb. 19, an excessive amount of lint in a dryer in Hubbard Hall sparked a dryer fire and resulted in a $96,000 loss.

No statistics were published for 2016 in the report.

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